Chapter 13: Vail Modern (for H.D.H.)

Chapter 13: Vail Modern (for H.D.H.)


Come inside. You’ve done enough, on the slopes of Chamonix or the sidewalks of Bushwick; on skis or the slippery blades of preoccupation. End your exertions. Drink a hot toddy, read something you’ve read before but can’t remember except to know it will restore you after another bout in winter’s ring.

Lawton Mull’s reinterpretation of the ski chalet: comfort, luxury, and a view of the Manhattan sky line. The grey links will take you to pages with more information about each piece in this installation.

The sectional sofa is attributed to Paul McCobb for Directional, and is recently re-upholstered in a storm-gray velvet. The 19th century French campaign bed is lavishly dressed in a musk ox hide. The room is punctuated by a pair of saddle-stitched leather and brass Jacques Adnet standing lamps. A vintage alligator suitcase is gilt-stamped with the monogram “H.D.H.”

The Kaare Klint Safari chairs are classic, and the leather is original. In the middle of the square, glass-top “Andre” coffee table, designed by Tobia Scarpa, rests a beautifully patinated Indian bronze vessel holding a bouquet of ozothamnus and eucalyptus. Framing the corner, a 1930s gilt iron, faux bamboo folding screen attributed to Maison Baguès.

The musk ox hide is a wondrous surprise. The fur is so dense and long, one’s hands get lost in it.

Also atop the coffee table, an Indian silver pandan box and an endearing Chinese pottery figure. Under it, an Afshar carpet. The Aerial photograph of Roden Crater was taken by James Turrell from a Helio Courier in the 1980s. The oxidized Victorian copper boiler in the corner is perfect for stashing firewood, blankets, or a case of prosecco on ice.

We can’t get enough of this 18th century Italian Rococo mirror. The bucolic landscape next to it is English, from the 19th century. A closer look:

The Francisque Chaleyssin limed oak étagère, circa 1940, makes a handsome showcase for books and objets, including a fine specimen of red coral and a Greek black figure Lekythos that held olive oil more than 2000 years ago. The 20th century grey stoneware jar provides a satisfying counterpoint.

We feel sure H.D.H. would have felt right at home here.

Please inquire about any items that have not yet been listed on our website. And drop us a line if you want to visit.